He started liking her photos, prompting her to ask Soji’s high-school friend if he was single. The way they met, they now say, doesn’t seem as weird to them as it does to other people.A seamstress, lingerie designer and burlesque performer who uses the stage name Lily Faye had tried online dating sites but hadn’t had good experiences on them.

They preferred meeting people at work, parties or church.

Their modern love story began one day when a photo popped up on Soji’s feed on Facebook-owned Instagram, of a high-school friend with a woman he didn’t know.

Musician Jacoby Jennings doesn’t like online dating sites.

Yet he found love over the internet anyway — through the music-streaming service Spotify.

Experts say online dating sites see a huge traffic increase between Christmas and Valentine’s Day.

With the number of visitors these sites get each month, that increase is pretty significant: Some current estimates report between 10.5 and 23.8 million unique visitors per month for two major dating sites.

Disenchanted or just plain turned off by online dating, people are finding love and romance in other corners of the internet.

Platforms designed for networking, gaming, blogging, answering questions and even making lists are doing unintended double duty as matchmakers. Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg announced last week that an optional service will allow singles to set up separate dating profiles, connecting through local events and private chats. It’s likely to be older people Neither Soji Ojugbele nor Muobo Ojugbele, who are now married, had ever dated online.

After a rough breakup last January, I was sad and single in the Big Apple.