As a business owner, you might ask: "Where is the legal issue?

" or "What's the best policy regarding workplace dating?

There will foreseeably be claims of favoritism, or even discrimination or harassment.

Relationships between supervisors and subordinates create even more potential problems.

In a better scenario, coworkers would find it easier to claim that an employee received preferential treatment from a supervisor he or she is dating.

In a poorer scenario, the relationship would end badly, one of the employees could claim that the relationship was non-consensual, or that sexual harassment existed.

An employee could even make a case for unlawful retaliation if he or she receives a poor performance review from a former lover (or if a co-worker receives a better evaluation from his or her boss).

There are a few different ways to manage this liability.

When it comes to workplace dating policies, here are a few basic options: Generally, policies cover not only employees, but also contractors, vendors, suppliers, manufacturers, and the like.

Essentially, any relationship between two people that could have a negative effect on the company if things sour, or if one party is able to improperly influence the other would fall under the policy.

One last generally acceptable rule: If you have a "C" (think CEO, CFO, COO) or VP in your title, you should always think twice about dating anyone in the workplace, even if he or she is not a direct report or within your chain of command.

According to the Career Builder survey, some industries are more prone to inter-office dating than others.