Some scholars oppose face covering, particularly in the West, where the woman may draw more attention as a result.These garments are very different in cut from most of the traditional forms of ħijāb, and they are worn worldwide by Muslims.A hardline Islamic leader says women need to wear the hijab so men can control their sexual urges.

Different scholars adopted different interpretations of the original texts.

Detailed scholarly attention has focused on prescribing female dress in conformity with hijab.

The four major Sunni schools of thought (Hanafi, Shafi'i, Maliki and Hanbali) hold that the entire body of the woman, except her face and hands – though a few clerics It is recommended that women wear clothing that is not form fitting to the body: either modest forms of western clothing (long shirts and skirts), or the more traditional jilbāb, a high-necked, loose robe that covers the arms and legs.

A khimār or shaylah, a scarf or cowl that covers all but the face, is also worn in many different styles.

Most often, it is worn by Muslim women as a symbol of modesty and privacy.

According to the Encyclopedia of Islam and Muslim World, modesty in the Quran concerns both men's and women's "gaze, gait, garments, and genitalia." In the Qur'an, the term hijab refers to a partition or curtain in the literal or metaphorical sense.The Arabic word jilbab is translated as "cloak" in the following passage.Contemporary Salafis insist that the jilbab (which is worn over the Kimaar and covers the body from head to toe) worn today is the same garment mentioned in the Qur'an and the hadith; other translators have chosen to use less specific terms: Debate focused on how much of the male or female body should be covered.Many Muslim scholars believe that it is a basic requirement of Islamic law that women keep their hair and bodies covered in the presence of people of the opposite sex other than close family members (those close enough to be forbidden to marry—see mahram).These include the Iraqi Shia Marja' (Grand Ayatollah) Ali al-Sistani; In nearly all Muslim cultures, young girls are not required to wear a ħijāb.Women in different parts of the world have also experienced unofficial pressure to wear or not wear hijab.