Not having to pick up laundry from the floor brings me utter joy.

Naively, I imagined that when he took them on holiday or away for the weekend, I’d talk to him every day.

But he didn’t have the mental capacity to speak to me when he was with them.

His mind was often preoccupied with the stress of the divorce, as well as the pain he felt at only seeing his children every other weekend. He’s more emotionally mature than the other men I’d dated and we fell in love.

I find it comforting to know that unlike many of the commitment-phobic men I’ve met, he is actually capable of being a husband and a fantastic father – he’s proved that.

There are some advantages to being on your own – advantages like getting up to pee in the middle of the night and not falling in the toilet because no one has left the seat up.

There’s something to be said for not having shaving gel and toothpaste globs stuck to your sink.

But being with someone who has crossed those milestones already is a journey.

You will always come second to his children; they will always be his priority.

There is this huge part of his life I have no place in. I’m hopeful this will change once I’ve met the children.

Until the divorce is finalised, we’ve decided it’s best that they don’t know about me, but I long for the day when I can attend his daughter’s assembly or his son’s football match – to share our lives with each other completely.

People need time to adjust to the major changes that divorce brings: different living situations, moving, financial struggles, and having to share time with your kids. It’s the death of your hopes, dreams, and beliefs that you will spend the rest of your life with your spouse. It’s wise to wait a year or so, so that you can evaluate your life, take inventory of who you are, change the things about you that you don’t like, and discover what exactly you’re looking for in a partner.