cultural anthropology: a subdiscipline of anthropology concerned with the non-biological, behavioral aspects of society; i.e.the social, linguistic, and technological components underlying human behavior.

low visibility phenomena for chronometric dating-70low visibility phenomena for chronometric dating-28low visibility phenomena for chronometric dating-29

artifact: any manually portable product of human workmanship (see feature).

In its broadest sense includes tools, weapons, ceremonial items, art objects, all industrial waste, and all floral and faunal remains modified by human activity.

Two important branches of cultural anthropology are ethnography (the study of living cultures) and ethnology (which attempts to compare cultures using ethnographic evidence).

In Europe, it is referred to as social anthropology.

amino-acid racemization: a method used in the dating of both human and animal bone.

Its special significance is that with a small sample (10g) it can be applied to material up to 100,000 years old, i.e. ancillary sample: any non-artifactual materials collected by archaeologists to aid in dating, paleoenvironmental reconstruction, or other interpretations - e.g.

cultural resource management (CRM): the safeguarding of the archaeological heritage through the protection of sites and through salvage archaeology (rescue archaeology), generally within the framework of legislation designed to safeguard the past.

culture-historical approach: an approach to archaeological interpretation which uses the procedure of the traditional historian (including emphasis on specific circumstances elaborated with rich detail, and processes of inductive reasoning).

Diatoms are unicellular algae, whose silica cell walls survive after the algae die, and they accumulate in large numbers at the bottom of rivers and lakes.