They should have a burner phone, he says (a disposable phone that can be used for temporary tasks and then discarded).Potential scammers are also advised to use virtual private networks and proxy services, both of which can help hide the scammer's real IP address and location in case law enforcement get involved.

Another way to spot whether an account is fake is the selection of photos that it uses.

Adhrann's guide says that scammers should "look on the Internet for a bunch of pics of a cute girl" and select someone who is "not a top model, but a normal sexy girl." To find photos, scammers can buy sets of photographs of young women, often through shady forums frequented by hackers.

Besides the fact that everyone is DTF, the major difference is that Mixxxer doesn’t sync with your Facebook profile, allowing you to upload any photos.

We’re obviously talking about the sans clothing kind.

It's pretty easy to tell: They send the same message over and over, often with the same link.

But there's a type of dating site scam that's far trickier to spot, and the people who operate it claim to be making thousands of dollars every month fooling vulnerable men.

The guide isn't available for free, in fact, it was being sold for Bitcoins on a deep web marketplace.

Bitcoin is cryptographic currency favoured by criminals as it allows semi-anonymous online transactions.

They are then instructed to take the information learned, and then create the "perfect woman" for the target.

Adhrann says that scammers should "emphasize on you being in a difficult financial situation, yet DO NOT insist on that, but treat this subject like you have been much better in the past, and really ashamed now, [as you are] not used to being poor." Step three is where things start getting really interesting.

Tinder’s X-rated brother, the adult-oriented hookup app Mixxxer, launched last week to help combat this problem and help users find nearby hookups without the hassle.“People don’t know when they’re using Tinder if you’re using it to hook up or if you’re using it to find a date,” the app’s maker, Michael Manes, told The Daily Dot.