Following the end of the Second World War, the spread of communism was considered to be the #1 threat to the United States.The Soviet Union’s ability to secure a nuclear weapon, coupled with the communist ideology spreading across the globe, fueled a state of fear during this time.[1] Even in the United States, the Communist Party USA (CPUSA) was gaining traction as a legitimate political party.

While the War on Drugs initially had a small impact on incarceration, it was President Reagan’s Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1986 that kickstarted the prison boom.[1] From 1970 to 2005, the prison population rose 700 percent, while violent crime remained steady or declined.[2] Between 19, the populations of private prisons shot up 1,600 percent.[3] Today, the US has the highest incarceration rate in the world – 754 inmates per 100k residents as of 2008.[1] This is roughly 600% that of the rest of the civilized world, with England and Wales having 148, and Australia 126 inmates per 100k residents.[1] As of 2010, private corporations house over 99,000 inmates in 260 facilities nationwide.[4] Corrections Corp.

of America and other private contractors became members of the American Legislative Exchange Council, a non-profit 501(c)(3) association that advocates “tough on crime” legislation.[5] In their 2010 report to the Securities and Exchange Commission, Corrections Corp.

” To correctly answer, one must select “protests” among the options of attacking the Pentagon, committing hate crimes and using IED’s.[13] In an interview with Fox News, the Do D stated that they have since removed the question.[14] In 2012, it was reported that FBI trained its agents that they can “bend or suspend the law” at will.[15] The training materials were uncovered during a six-month internal review of the Bureau’s training policies.

Despite its findings, the review has not resulted in any disciplinary action, nor did it require any re-training.[16] With the “terrorism” label being used so loosely, many are critical of the 2012 National Defense Authorization Act.

There is much debate on the legitimacy of the consolidation of media, with strong proponents[2][3][4] and opponents[5][6][7] bringing forth a wide variety of arguments.[8] Regardless of your position on the viability of the concentration of media ownership into fewer and fewer hands, it is an irrefutable fact that over the past few decades the corporations controlling the preponderance of American media have lessened considerably.[9] As of 2011, the largest media corporations in the United States in terms of revenue and profit are: General Electric[10], Walt Disney, News Corp., Time Warner, CBS and Viacom.[11] Walt Disney – or more specifically Disney Media Networks – controls a staggering amount of media outlets.[12] In the field of motion pictures, they own Walt Disney Pictures (which includes Pixar Animation Studios), Touchstone Pictures and Hollywood Pictures.

They then distribute these films through Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment while distributing soundtracks and original music under Walt Disney Records and Hollywood Records.

Prison privatization in its current form began in 1984 as a result of the War on Drugs.

While crime rates otherwise remained steady dating back to 1925, the number of arrests quickly exploded.

The CIA was tasked with combating this threat abroad, and the FBI at home.[1] In 1956, the FBI instituted a Counter Intelligence Program (Co Intel Pro) which among its goals, was to maintain “the existing social and political order.”[2][4] This initially meant targeting the CPUSA, who was implicated in the passing of nuclear secrets to the Soviet Union several years prior.

However, operating in secrecy with very little oversight, Co Intel Pro’s scope was later widened to include any group the FBI deemed “subversive.”[2] Among these groups were the Womens’ Rights Movement, the Civil Rights movement, and the growing anti-war movement.

Individual students demonstrating against the Vietnam War were targeted by the FBI, along with American luminaries such as Martin Luther King Jr.