Harper's new program will require Canada to "invest as much as million a year in projects across the Americas that combat the illicit drug trade, corruption, human trafficking, and other regional problems." Nearly half a million dollars (0,000) "will go to Mexico to help fight its drug war." Thus, as part of his attempt to "help" Mexico fend off cartels, Harper has authorized Canadian Mounties to "train 300 mid-level Mexican police officers with the help of the United States and other countries.The Mounties will also train 32 new police commanders in such areas as police management, investigation and intelligence skills." The question of what exactly Canadian law enforcement has to offer the Mexican military with regard to police training remains unanswered, but "[f]unding for the program has already been earmarked in the January federal budget," so interested readers can watch the program's progress as it moves along early next year.

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According to an August 9, 2009 article posted by Canwest News Service, "Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced Sunday that Canada will train Mexican police officers to assist Mexico in its brutal drug war against rival drug cartels" ("Canada to Train Mexican Officers to Fight Drug Cartels").

The training plan is part of Harper's recently announced anti-crime bill, the Anti-Crime Capacity Building Program, which he unveiled in anticipation of the "so-called Three Amigos Summit," an annual meeting of North American leadership from Mexico, the United States, and Canada.

Moreover, the Bulletin notes, "unlike needles," crack kits "could be reused by drug addicts several times." Victoria should be applauded for approving this laudable idea that not only assists crack users in ingesting the drug more safely but also expands upon the success of harm reduction measures more typically associated with heroin users.

On June 25, 2009, the Vancouver Sun ("Canada Primary Source of Ecstasy in Drug Trade") reported that this year's "United Nations report on the world drug trade reiterates what [British Columbian] police forces have been saying for a couple of years now: Canada has become a global producer of 'party' drugs, especially ecstasy. accounted for more than 80 per cent of the methamphetamine labs reported worldwide in 2007 -- almost 6,000 of them.

As Salem News reported on May 14, 2009 ("Canada: Feds to Pay for Military Veterans['] Medical Marijuana"), Canada's "federal government has decided to pay for medical cannabis for some veterans" in a reversal of Canadian Veterans' Affairs' previous ban on doing so.

The policy is not all-inclusive, nor is it perfect; as Salem states, "Payments can be made only to veterans licensed by Health Canada to possess medical marijuana, and who buy government-certified cannabis." Additionally, the Drug War Chronicle reports that "Only about 3,000 of the estimated 400,000 people who use medical marijuana in Canada are licensed through Health Canada, and only a small fraction of them obtain their marijuana from Health Canada." Furthermore, "Patients and advocates have long complained that Health Canada's sole-source monopoly marijuana is of low quality" ("Canada: Veterans Affairs to Cover Medical Marijuana Expenses").

According to the Nanaimo News Bulletin September 10, 2008 article,("Drug Testing Hits Construction;") "An agreement between B.

C.'s unionized construction workers and their employers has created a new industry-wide policy requiring workers who have workplace accidents or near misses to undergo mandatory drug and alcohol testing.

If enacted, the bill would impose mandatory minimum sentences on certain drug crimes - including those of the nonviolent variety - in a misguided attempt to target "serious drug traffickers, the people who are basically out to destroy our society," as Justice Minister Rob Nicholson explained.